Round Up

Christianity as it was defined originally by Christ – “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” John 13:34-35

Has the Church Sold Its Soul to Consumerism? – The Evangelical church in the twenty-first century has in many ways absorbed the consumeristic mentality that is so prevalent in the culture. Churches approach worship as if they were selling a product and the attendee were the consumer. Since the product is up for sale, churches must show that their product is more entertaining than anything else the world has to offer.

The Most Christian Nation – Probably not your first thought.

Unjuggling – Just for fun.

Quote:

“Be very sure of this–people never reject the Bible because they cannot understand it. They understand it too well; they understand that it condemns their own behavior; they understand that it witnesses against their own sins, and summons them to judgment. They try to believe it is false and useless, because they don’t like to believe it is true. An evil lifestyle must always raise an objection to this book. Men question the truth of Christianity because they hate the practice of it.” – J. C. Ryle

Daily Roundup

16 Rules for Biblical Interpretation – A noteworthy list that needs to be applied by those of us who read and study the Bible.

“These Things” – Several “things” to think about from the book of John.

A Thankful Heart – Do we have a thankful heart?  I tweeted this morning the following, “If God is sovereign over all, when we complain we are actually questioning God; we are sinning against His sovereignty.”  We should be thankful in ALL things!

The Humble Celebrity – What a refreshing story.  It is just sad that stories like this are so rare today.

What Happens When We Read the Bible? – This gave me something to think about this morning.

Quote:

Today, an extraction from Carl Trueman’s book, The Creedal Imperative which deals with creeds in the Church:

I do want to make the point here that Christians are not divided between those who have creeds and confessions and those who do not; rather, they are divided between those who have public creeds and confessions and that are written down and exist as public documents, subject to public scrutiny, evaluation, and critique, and those who have private creeds and confessions that are often improvised, unwritten, and thus not open to public scrutiny, not susceptible to evaluation and, crucially and ironically, not, therefore, subject to testing by Scripture to see whether they are true (p. 15).