Round Up

Preaching is Dangerous – A preacher’s authority does not come merely from his calling or anointing, but he has authority only to the degree that he correctly interprets and clearly proclaims the truths of Scriptures.

A Practical Understanding Of The Sufficiency of Scripture – Part 1 – I can’t wait for Part 2!

Where Did All These Calvinists Come From – A visual to show you where they have come from.

Celebrity Pastors:  A Retrospective – In retrospect, the critics were to be treated as the problem, but the band was to play on.

A Time Lapse – I love these things and would like to create my own one day.

Quote:

Phil Johnson on the Imminence of God from the sermon Providence is Remarkable:  God personally and constantly and permanently and exhaustively pervades and sustains and governs every aspect of His creation.  God is personally present and meticulously at work in everything that happens, even when He is not manifesting His presence by miracles.

Daily Roundup

16 Rules for Biblical Interpretation – A noteworthy list that needs to be applied by those of us who read and study the Bible.

“These Things” – Several “things” to think about from the book of John.

A Thankful Heart – Do we have a thankful heart?  I tweeted this morning the following, “If God is sovereign over all, when we complain we are actually questioning God; we are sinning against His sovereignty.”  We should be thankful in ALL things!

The Humble Celebrity – What a refreshing story.  It is just sad that stories like this are so rare today.

What Happens When We Read the Bible? – This gave me something to think about this morning.

Quote:

Today, an extraction from Carl Trueman’s book, The Creedal Imperative which deals with creeds in the Church:

I do want to make the point here that Christians are not divided between those who have creeds and confessions and those who do not; rather, they are divided between those who have public creeds and confessions and that are written down and exist as public documents, subject to public scrutiny, evaluation, and critique, and those who have private creeds and confessions that are often improvised, unwritten, and thus not open to public scrutiny, not susceptible to evaluation and, crucially and ironically, not, therefore, subject to testing by Scripture to see whether they are true (p. 15).